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We dine well here in Camelot We eat ham and jam and spam a lot.

May 27, 2013

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Oh, hello there!  Remember me?  Don’t feel bad if you don’t, I know it’s been a while.  For those of you still checking in periodically, thank you.  And please accept my apologies for slacking off so much.  I haven’t stopped baking, far from it.  I’ll make something fantastic, be very excited about blogging it, and then…distraction happens (surprise!).  Before I start writing, I should probably update my iOS, or research new cameras, or make a facebook page, or think about twitter, or contemplate a new theme, or ponder taking loveysoven in a slightly different direction, or…. crap, suddenly it’s been months.  Oops.

Anyway, I’ve been getting a lot of good-natured razzing from friends and family lately on the state of my ‘invisible’ blog.  The ribbing, combined with a most excellent weekend adventure, has inspired me to put intentions into action and dust off the cobwebs!

As many of you know, I’m a big fan of King Arthur Flour.  Their products are top-notch and their recipes rarely disappoint.  I’ve even been known to refer to their store in Vermont as ‘The Mothership.’   Needless to say, I was pleased as punch to discover that my birthday gift from mrslovey this year was a weekend getaway – a night at an historic inn, followed by a class at KAF.  Yeah, she’s good. Image

We drove up to Vermont on Saturday, and checked into the most perfect room at the most perfect Inn.  After dinner and some exploring, we capped off the evening at the Inn’s alehouse, where mrslovey sampled several of their creations and deemed them delicious.  Sunday morning was an I-could-get-used-to-this-life-of-leisure breakfast, and then it was time for class!

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I found my thrill

July 23, 2012

The other day I was flipping through a cookbook that focuses on what to do with seasonal produce, probably trying to find something to do with an influx of summer squash.  Because I’m easily distracted (believe it!), I found myself instead staring at a recipe for blueberry sage muffins.  At first I was quizzical, head tilted to the side like that little RCA dog. But as I thought about it more, I realized that those flavors would actually go together beautifully.  Yay!  Off to the oven I went.

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Olive you, a bushel and a peck

January 4, 2012

This past weekend was a milestone birthday for mrslovey, so I wanted to make her something special.  Something she’d love.  Something I find disgusting.  Ingredients and opportunity combined, and I found myself making this recipe from KAF, a rosemary-olive-asiago loaf.  After making mrslovey chop the olives (have I mentioned I find them disgusting?), the recipe pulled together quickly and easily, I and had the whole thing in the oven within 10 minutes.

The cheese on top turned into a nice savory, crunchy topping, the interior of the loaf was (according to reports) moist with good texture, and the herbs and cheese held up to the olives well.  A little on the rich side, but overall delicious (if you like that kind of thing).

I used sharp cheddar instead of asiago, and I didn’t have fresh herbs or green onions, so used some chives that we had dehydrated at the end of summer.  Other than that, I made it as written.  I saw a reviewer mention that they made this and loved it, but without olives, because they dislike them.  Really?  So pray tell, why did you decide to choose a recipe that says OLIVE in the title? Sheesh.  Anywho, while this was not a recipe that I chose to eat, mrslovey found it delightful, and that’s good enough for me.  I’ll keep making it for her as often as she wants, as long as I never have to actually *touch* the olives.  Seems like a fair trade.

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Whole Lotta Loaf

September 18, 2011

Zucchini, am I right?  It has a reputation as the tribble of the vegetable patch – reproducing at such a rapid pace that if you so much as blink an eye, you’ll be buried up to your armpits.  This summer in our house it was actually tomatoes and peppers that went on into infinity, but that’s another story for another time.

Anyway, zucchini.  I must admit, I’m not really a fan of summer squashes.  I have a fierce love of autumn squashes, but not so much the summer varieties.  So of course, we received a fair amount from our farm share this year.  For the most part we were able to foist them off on other people (hi Mom!).  We actually hit the point where we thought we had avoided them successfully for the entire summer…but we were wrong.  The end of summer finds us at the farm, listening in terror as our farmer says “here’s some zucchini that we had overlooked in the field, they’ve grown a bit larger than normal.”  And then she hands us the world’s largest zucchini.  Huge.  Enormous.  Gigantic.  Seriously, this thing is a freaking zucchini zeppelin, I am not joking.

Now, if you want to stay in your farmer’s good graces, you never, NEVER scrunch up your nose and saw ‘ewwww’ when they hand you something that they grew, even if it’s something you’ve disliked forever.  Nope, the correct response is to accept it graciously, and then go home and figure out what the hell to do with the damn thing.   Read the rest of this entry »

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How to make a lamb cake in 20 gabillion easy steps

April 24, 2011

Ever seen one of these?  It’s a mold for a lamb-shaped cake.  A little creepy, but there you go.  Mrslovey’s great-aunties used to make a lamb cake every Easter, and it made quite an impression on her.  When they passed away, mrslovey became keeper of the mold.  Which, if you stop and think about it, means that *I* became keeper of the mold, because she doesn’t bake.  Mostly it just lives in the pan closet, but this year she requested that I revive the tradition and make a lamb for Easter.   Following is a step-by-step demo of the process.

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Grover’s velvet moon suede shoes (or, things which are blue)

March 30, 2011

When my friend V turned 40 last spring, she decided to throw a party for a few close friends.  A girls’ night, if you will, composed of a half-dozen women from the different parts of her life.  We had a great time catching up with some old friends, and making a few new ones.  We played games, drank a lot of wine, and everybody brought a dish to share.  I volunteered for the cake (well, these cupcakes, to be exact).  The recipe name sounds intimidating, but they were rather straightforward to make.  The cakes themselves were moist, chocolatey, and delicious.  I was more worried about the frosting.  Seven minute frosting?  What the heck is that?  I was nervous, but it was simply a matter of reading the recipe through, having the ingredients all measured out and lined up before I started, and then following one step at a time.   Read the rest of this entry »

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No ordinary ordinaire

January 30, 2011

I think the very first bread book I ever acquired was Ultimate Bread by Eric Treuille & Ursula Ferrigno.*  At that point in time I had no interest whatsoever in making yeast breads, but there were lots of shiny, gorgeous pictures, so I bought it anyway.  I figured if nothing else, it would be nice to flip through once and then add to the cookbook shelf.  As I paged through, however, I became intrigued.  This book is filled with tons of information, describing a wide variety of processes and techniques, and the accompanying pictures show what things should look like at different stages of the recipes.  Very cool, but it was still relegated to the shelf for several years.  Yeast bread is scary, am I right???
I finally picked it back up when I was frustrated at work one day and needed something outside of my comfort zone to distract me.  Turns out, yeast breads aren’t so terrifying after all.  They require a little more attention, but the payoff is totally worth it.  Working with the dough satisfied something inside me.  The texture, feel, and smell of first the dough and then the completed loaf soothed the savage beast, so to speak.  And for major bonus points, I discovered that kneading the dough was a great way to relax, pull some of the stress out of my shoulders, and it even seemed to help with some repetitive stress pain I’d been experiencing in my wrist.  These days I mostly use the mixer to knead, but every once in a while I’ll still work the dough by hand.

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